Issue#04—2021
Issue#04—2021

Issue#04—2021

As we report on the latest developments in contemporary galvanized steel structures from across the world, we are pleased that this issue gets to the heart of the questions facing construction today – how to build innovatively, with confidence, for a low carbon future.

We are glad to say that all of the projects and articles in this edition show how designers, architects and contractors are responding to these issues with creativity and boldness. We are equally proud to showcase how the galvanizing industry is helping them achieve the solutions.

From green scaffolding that accommodates vertical vegetation, to groundbreaking projects like the 516 Arouca suspension bridge, which finds new ways to connect visitors with the landscape in a UNESCO natural heritage site, galvanizing is supporting innovation and green solutions.

Recently our industry has been promoting the circular benefits of galvanized steel, highlighting its suitability for reuse, remaking and repurposing. Our article on the recyclability of galvanized steel also shows that once all available lifecycle options have been exhausted, galvanized steel is ideally suited to recycling.

As these and many other galvanized steel projects show, progress is being made and hopefully that a net zero future is closer than many think.

Iqbal Johal, Editor

516 Arouca, Portugal

Located next to the Paiva Walkways, the world’s longest pedestrian suspension bridge, 516 Arouca, was built in order to consolidate the active tourism project in the Paiva valley, facilitating access to the Eastern area of the municipality of Arouca. The…

Read more

Closing the loop: solutions for a circular economy

Circular, sustainable management means manufacturing long-lasting products that are reusable, can be repaired and which are recycled at the end of their life. Hot dip galvanized steel meets these criteria and is particularly sustainable as both the steel and zinc…

Read more

The Electric Nemeton

SJS completed a new installation for Granary Square, The Electric Nemeton, which draws on the origins of the Christmas tree tradition, referencing the forest groves that acted as gathering places in Celtic culture. Reimagined here with geometry, colour and light…

Read more